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Search Results 0 to 49 of about 999 (some duplicates have been removed)
kicks off his second term with a call for national unity. >> a regional election in germany, a wakeup call for the chancellor. >> and extreme winter weather halts travel across much of northern europe. >> we start this show in washington where president obama balm has publicly taken the oath of office for his second term. he had to take it twice. >> official ceremony held in private on sunday at the white house. now the ceremonial swearing in in front of more than 700,000 people that showed up. >> and an international audience watching on tv. a lot of europeans want to know which way the world's biggest economy is headed and can politicians sort things out. here is a man that thinks he can make a difference the second time around. obama then looked forward to his next and final four years in office calling an end to the politics of division and saying the united states could achieve anything if it acted as one. >> a decade of war is now ending. an economic recovery has begun. america's possibilities are limitless, for we possess all of the qualities this world without boundaries deman
is here at it is about our president. take back the house, elected democrats at every level of government and fight for our values for 100% of the american people. thank you. thank you, madam chair. [applause] >> thank you, secretary. the next item on the committee's agenda is the report from the credentials committee. i'd like to recognize co-chairs to give us an update on this. >> in a. >> thank you, madam chair. on the have of the rest of the potential committee we are honored to present our report. >> the credentials committee received a challenge to the election of dnc members from the state of georgia, and a challenge to the election process used in the election of dnc members from virginia. >> most of these challenges were received in a timely fashion, and reviewed by the credentials committee co-chair. after reviewing each of these challenges, the co-chairs determined that neither of the challenges have merit and the members under challenge were to comment to be properly elected members of the democratic national committee. >> with that, we now recommend to this body the adoption
yourselves, a mobster colleagues, a monster elected official so we can -- amongst your colleagues and amongst your elected officials. the speakers and the sponsors are invited to a post the event a luncheon on the second floor. i want to give all of the speakers and sponsors a round of applause. thank you. [applause] [captions copyright national cable satellite corp. 2013] [captioning performed by national captioning institute] >> next, remarks from paul ryan and scott walker. live at 7:00, your calls and comments on "the washington journal." >> one of the key themes for any exhibition on the civil war of the twin issues of abolition and emancipation. we are fortunate they came of age when they did because between the two of them, they make issues around emancipation and abolition, issues around human rights and the american freedom on a general not raise specific level. i will go through every piece of information that johnson puts it to this picture. i will summarize by saying if you pay attention to the top half as well as the bottom half, there is a letter going from the bedroom window up
, the folks that were elected with us, the senators that have arrived in the last five or ten years. i think we have the ability to respond in a big, bold way to the crises that face us. and i know senator merkley, you came here a young man with senator hatfield i believe and you saw a different senate. maybe you could talk about that and we don't want to stay, i know we're going to a caucus and we have our generous chair here, so we don't want to keep her up there too long, our presiding officer. anyway, senator merkley, i yield. mr. merkley: i think my colleague from new mexico is absolutely right in pointing out there were periods when the senate really worked to address the big issues facing america. and it wawnltd that there weren't -- wasn't that there weren't profound differences. there were fierce differences, emotional differences, deep differences but folks came to this floor, they conversed, they laid out their arguments and ultimately they made decisions about which way to go. and they didn't bring the attitude let's just paralyze this chamber from doing doing nothing. had they d
. that is we had a very tough election, in which fundamental issues were debated, the rights of gay and lesbian people, the right to vote because of the assault on the fundamental right to vote that took place in so many states, climate change, a continuation of our commitment to think medicare and social security and the noes thtion th inequality is not a necessary component of the economy. and we want to believe all of those issues. and i think what the president was saying, was, look, we have elections. and when you have a full debate in an election and the outcome is pretty clear cut, then it's his obligation and his right to move forward on all of those issues. >> and as we are watching the navajo nation just went by, their float, one of the things i saw today, melissa, is the whole changing of the demographics of america was reflected at the inauguration, as we look at native americans float goes by, as we heard a president for the first time refer in an inaugural address to same-sex marriage and to gay rights and talking about gender rights and he was sworn in on martin luther king's bib
to steal the next election. tonight democrats roll out their plan to stop them. this is "the ed show." let's get to work. >> the good news is our principles are sound. >> reince priebus sees no problem with his party. >> win elections, we must compete in every state and every region. >> except they just can't win. but the gop has a quick fix, steal the vote. debbie wasserman schultz and nina turner tell us the democrats' plan to fight back. >>> real filibuster reform is dead, and mitch mcconnell is gloating. we beat the liberals. senator bernie sanders is here to react. >>> conservatives said the market would die without mitt romney as president. >> the dow is sitting at this five-year high. it's actually been up for ten out of the last 11 sessions. >> we've got to stop being the stupid. >> bobby jindal. >> no, the republican party does not need to change its principles. >> with the same old lines. karen finney and eugene robinson take on the losing strategy. >>> senator saxby chambliss of georgia is a lame duck. tonight we look at his flawed legacy. >>> and more on the fallout from the pb
and elsewhere around the globe. israelis went to the polls in general elections today. prime minister jet -- prime minister benjamin netanyahu claimed victory after exit polls showed he would likely lead, the government with a narrow majority. our correspondent is in jerusalem with the latest. >> welcome to jerusalem after three months of a lackluster election campaign. suddenly, israeli politics came alive today about an hour before the polls closed. there was growing excitement and speculation. as expected, benjamin netanyahu is likely to lead the next government. he will be the prime minister for the next four years, but it is a weakened prime minister. his coalition did not get the number of seats it wanted. only 31, according to exit polls. that is down from the 42 that the two parties had during the last election. what kind of coalition will be formed? it could be the right and religious parties. that is not what he wants. the television presenter, his party came in second place. he said his party will not expect to be in any coalition. will it be a shaky coalition between the right
appeal in time for the next presidential election. within the last hour, the rnc re-electing priebus to party chairman. >> we must compete in every state and every region, building relationships with communities we haven't before. at the rnc, we're dropping the red and blue state analysis. we must be a party concerned about every american and every neighborhood. >> all right. so louisiana's governor jindal addressing members last night and today is making headlines for this very frank assessment. >> we've got to stop being the stupid party. and i'm serious. it is time for a new republican party that talks like adults. it is time for us to articulate our plans and vision for america in real terms. we had a number of republicans that damaged the brand this year with offensive and bizarre comments. we have had enough of that. >> we have real challenges and we did get whipped at the -- in the presidential election and that's not something that we take lightly. >> meanwhile, the gop catching flack for proposed changes to the electoral college system that would make it easier for them to w
-- she pushed back hard. >> rose: we conclude this evening with the a look at the surprising elections in israel with david remnick, mort zuckerman, and dennis ross. >> i don't want us to be deluded and think because lapid somehow got an outsized amount of votes suddenly the country has moved dramatically to the left. it has not. it has not. and i think we need to have a more tragic sense of what's going on in terms of the palestinian question, which is the one that concerns us the most. certainly it is in the top three of the big questions about israel. and there's not going to be dramatic movement on that at all. >> rose: what happened in benghazi, and the israeli elections when we continue. captioning sponsored by rose communications from our studios in new york city, this is charlie rose. >> rose: we begin this evening with secretary of state clinton on capitol hill. lawmakers questions her earlier today about the september 11, 2012 attacks on the american consulate in benghazi, libya. four americans were killed that day, including ambassador christopher stevens. secretary clinton'
elections, is thinking fast or has been over the past two weeks of the popularity threshold and angela merkel has been riding and both of their parties are dithering. the sbc slightly inching higher and the sdu inching lower and they're both losing ground in a grander scale. it's the small parties that are the winners, definitely the green wes a record high of over 13%. they're the ones that won the election and lost it for the cdu, not stoeshl democrats themselves. and the liberals, the sdp, many had counted them out and there was an expectation or there was a fear for some that they couldn't even make the century hurdle that you need to get into parliament. they beat that. about you also for the personality ratings and the criticism on a federal scale, but that was his home turf so there was a lot of sympathy vote going in there. the big parties will have to look carefully for coalition partners. the social democrats will try to align themselves with the green that might not be enough. the stronger the greens get, the more the social democrats usually lose and something similar you h
mouse gimmick to win elections without having to win with the most number of votes. rebel all of those cuts and the effort to make it harder for people to vote, all of that targeting to vote in ways that people don't like voting? well, now they're trying something new. they don't like states like pennsylvania that regularly vote democratic. so some kwauk thougquack thaugo to give the rural votes more power. their decided to kill the power of how the real state goes overall. if they can't get people to vote for them, they try to kill the power of those who don't. will they get away with it? not if you stay tuned and keep an eye on these little buggers. they've got their mickey mouse ears on. "politics nation" with al sharpton starts right now. >> thanks, chris. and thanks to you for tuning in. tonight's lead, president obama won. this president has no time to waste and he's using it to push for change on gun control, on immigration, on climate change, on ending the ban on women serving in combat. he's got a full agenda. and it was on full display today. remember all of that bluster from
to make sure that we move towards free and fair elections so that there is a legitimate post couey election area -- post-coup government. we have got a short-term challenge in restoring their security. the french, i think, in partnership with the military, are doing a great job. there are longer-term challenges, restoring things. this is what led to the rebellion and the coup in the first place. >> do you think they should be deploying drones? >> we have used drones against al qaeda in pakistan, afghanistan, and other places in the world. i think it is incumbent on us in the senate to make sure we have a framework for when and how we're going to approve the use of drones. i do think they are an important tool in our toolkit to fight back against islamic extremists and to take action against folks who have demonstrated to be a real threat to the united states and our regional allies. >> thank you very much for joining us from capitol hill tonight. >> thank you. >> in other news now, senior officials say that leon panetta, the defense secretary, decided to lift a ban about women in c
pushed back hard. >> rose: we conclude this evening with the a look at the surprising elections in israel with david remnick, mort zuckerman, and dennis ross. >> i don't want us to be deluded and think because lapid somehow got an outsized amount of votes suddenly the country has moved dramatically to the left. it has not. it has not. and i think we need to have a more tragic sense of what's going on in terms of the palestinian question, which is the one that concerns us the most. certainly it is in the top three of the big questions about israel. and there's not going to be dramatic movement on that at all. >> rose: what happened in benghazi, and the israeli elections when we continue. captioning sponsored by rose communications from our studios in new york city, this is charlie rose. >> rose: we begin this evening with secretary of state clinton on capitol hill. lawmakers questions her earlier today about the september 11, 2012 attacks on the american consulate in benghazi, libya. four americans were killed that day, including ambassador christopher stevens. secretary clinton's testimon
the parliamentary elections this week. will they satisfy protesters or inflame them? we'll get the king's reaction. then, the prime minister of r h russia dmitry medvedev. some call it a new cold war. who's to blame and will russia help in syria? we'll discuss it all. >>> also, the algerian hostage crisis that left dozens dead. is this a sign of a grave, new terror threat? i'll tell you my view. >>> but, first, here's my take. every year at davos people like me try to get a sense of the mood of the place. take the temperature of people in this frosty mountain resort. obviously, i will give you a highly impressionistic and personal picture, but one i find useful since davod does bring together leaders and government, business and media and even the ngo community from all corners of the world. it is genuinely global in a way that few conferences are. so, what is the mood? well, there's a sense of calm, a relief that many storms that seem like they might be overwhelming like the euro crisis have been weathered. people from america are optimistic. those from emerging markets more so, but everywhere t
's nominations today a perfect example of how elections have consequences? >> well, sitting where i'm sitting, not in the clint eastwood chair, i would say yes, it certainly does. it's a case of continuing a very tough policy of enforcement at the sec. so the president is sending a signal that at least in this area of regulation enforcement, he's not going to be backing down at all. surely, that's exactly what wall street and corporate america expected when he won that election. >> and that was the way he campaigned. in many ways, we're looking at, joan, him continuing the path that he campaign ds oed on, gots on and won. look at the poll on rights for gay people, 60%. on aid to the poor, 59%, on tax levels for millionaires and big corporation, 59%. women's issue, 55%. immigration, 55%. i mean, these are high numbers of people feeling the gop is out of touch on these issues. >> yeah, i mean, reverend al, the shocking thing is, as you just laid out, the support for democratic policies is even h h higher than support for democratic politicians. the president won a decisive victory, but the sup
in benghazi, and the israeli elections when we continue. captioning sponsored by rose communications from our studios in new york city, this is charlie rose. >> rose: we begin this evening with secretary of state clinton on capitol hill. lawmakers questions her earlier today about the september 11, 2012 attacks on the american consulate in benghazi, libya. four americans were killed that day, including ambassador christopher stevens. secretary clinton's testimony had been post toned until now. she took responsibility and emsized her commitment to improving diplomat security abroad. >> as i have mentioned many times i take responsibility and nobody is more committed to getting this right. i am determined to leave the state department and our country safer, stronger, and more secure. now, taking responsibility meant moving quickly in those first uncertain hours and days to respond to the immediate crisis, but, also, to further protect our people and posts in high-threat areas across the region and the world. it meant launching an independent investigation to determine exactly what happened in b
as it was four years ago. make sure you know that what we are celebrating is not the election or swearing in of a president, what we are doing is celebrating each other. and celebrating this incredible nation that we call home. and after we celebrate, let's make sure to work as hard as we can to pass on an america that is worthy, not only of our past, but also of our future. god bless you. i love you. we will see you tomorrow. [applause] ♪ ["we take care of our own"] ♪ ♪ ["only in america"] ♪ >> as part of our inauguration fightge, the u.s. army's and drum corps -- they will escort president obama down pennsylvania avenue during the inaugural parade. ♪ [drum line] >> it began in april with the production team. it prepares the materials, the music, the drill that we do. parade marching does not require quadrilles, but we do a great deal of research with 18th-century music portrayed on modern instruments that aren't -- that are reminiscent of instruments during the revolutionary war. the rangers a range of vignettes -- are arranged vignettes music from the 18th century that has m
with that. right after the election this year, after insisting publicly over and over again that there was no need to strip union rights in the state of michigan, michigan republicans, surprise, passed a bill doing just that, and governor rick snyder signed it. the whole thing was opened, passed, and shut within a week, never mind what we said before, we're doing it. surprise. michigan is amazing, right? i mean michigan is the state with the republican law to let the state fire all your locally elected officials and unilaterally abolish your town if they want to on their own say so, no matter how you vote. in november this past election, michigan voters repealed that with a direct vote, the will of the people. the month after that, governor snyder and the republicans in the legislature gave the voters of michigan a big michigan republican one-finger salute. they decided to pass and sign into law a new emergency manager law to replace the one that the voters just killed. except this new one can't be killed by the voters. what's that you say? the will of the who now? i'm sorry
not expect to witness an election won by overinflate. some will look longingly on the time when one candidate dominated the political scene. lyndon johnson grittily be very goldwater and richard nixon, overwhelming george mcgovern. each of those elections, one of the candidates failed to capture the spirit of the american voting public and the winner had the advantage of a weak opponent. franklin roosevelt won his second term landslide because of huge popularity. and many of our presidential elections, the candidates are in a fitted title to present themselves as the one capable of serving the country with the winner is walking off with the modern maturity. the customary wisdom that the campaign between the incumbent president and his opponent will be either a referendum on the first term of the president or a judgment of which candidate would be the better theater. is there really a difference between these two considerations? is it not boil down to judging the leadership skill of the incumbent based on effectiveness during his first term versus the unknown leadership skills of the challenge
elections. he was asked if the president has met his expectations during the first term. >> he has seen the economy come up again, and the employment -- unemployment rate is still too high but i think this will improve. we're out of iraq and we are changing our policy in afghanistan, and osama bin laden is dead. the president has made a commitment to education and he is running with a 52% approval rate, and this is a good start for a second term. >> what about the critics of the president to say that the deficit has grown and he has not put his weight behind climate change. in his first address, he mentioned climate change three times. and there are still problems in the country and the criticism -- is that he has given a fabulous speech but has not followed through. >> i think some of the criticism is fair but you have to also talk about his initial priorities or challenges. he is really committed to doing something about this in the second term. the deficit is one of the most difficult issues and the president -- he does not sign the appropriation bills until they are passed by congre
elected person i suppose, that would make it a crime for rape victims to get abortions. the text of her bill reads, tampering with evidence shall include procuring or facilitating an abortion or compelling or coercing another to obtain abortion of a fetus that's the result of criminal sexual penetration or incest with the intent to destroy evidence of the crime. why do they get into this stuff? what in their mind magnetized them to even be talking about rape after what they've been through with mourdock and what's that guy's name? >> akin. >> todd akin. >> because they believe it. >> but they don't think about it, do they? >> i guess they do. this is the issue. it's not about stopping stupid remarks, as haley barbour or bobby jindal say or peggy noonan. they believe in self-deportation a lot of them. that wasn't a stupid remark. it was politically, but that's what mitt romney campaigned on. they believe in preventing gay marriage. they believe in -- >> that said, almost half the people agree with some of this stuff, so don't marginalize it all. >> say on the tax policy, they fought on r
we're celebrating is not the election or swearing-in of a president. what we're doing is celebrating each other. and celebrating this incredible nation that we call home. and after we celebrate, let's make sure to work as hard as we can to pass on an america that is worthy not only of our past but also of our future. god bless you guys. i love you. we'll see you tomorrow. [ applause ] ♪ >> the president of the united states, with the first lady and the vice president and the second lady over at the national building museum here in washington. the festivities only just beginning. getting ready for the big inauguration tomorrow. piers morgan is getting ready to take over our coverage. great to have you here on the national mall. >> very exciting. i have never done an inauguration before. incredibly exciting. i was struck there by the body of the language. seems very relaxed man and comes from being re-elected and facing another great, historic day, a man much more at ease than perhaps the nerve last time. >> four years as president and now another four years and he was elected pretty
from that guy. i think they won in a low turn in elections in wisconsin. i think everybody should run now. go into elections where there's a lot of voters so you don't get this weird warped sense of people who supposedly represent the american electorate. that guy doesn't represent anybody. your thoughts. the current secretary of state's performance today against the performance on the side of the right. >> he was so overmatched, ron johnson. he opened questions by saying it could have been taken a very simple phone call to ascertain the truth. my god, did he look at the pictures of that carnage? nothing was very simple. he proved he's very simple. his questions were disrespectful and i was thrilled that she got angry at him. women are sometimes told never to get emotional or angry. she did both. she choked up a bit in her introduction and got angry at ron johnson as she should. she lectured rand paul. on had i been president, you would have been fired. >> to consider the prospect of rand paul. but he's got none. >> he has a healthy imagination. >> you mentioned compassion and feeling
in november's election. the committee is calling from a republican renewal. a time for change. to build new relationships, to compete in every state in every region. hmm. sounds bold, even promising. so who are the republicans turning to? turning to lead their bold, new plan. >> the ayes have it. priebus is elected chairman. >> huh? huh? that's how they started? with reince priebus, the same guy who helped get them into the mess? but, okay, let's give them a chance with their bold, new plan. what's at the top of the to do list? >> we've got to stop being the stupid party. and i'm serious. it's time for a new republican party that talks like adults. it's no secret that we had a number of people that damaged the brain with offensive comments. >> stop being the stupid party. okay. okay. i can get behind that. what's next? >> we've got to compete for every single vote. 47% and the 53% and, by the way, any other combination of that that adds up to a hundred percent. >> and newt gingrich agrees, i'm for 100 percent of the american people believing that they have a party that cares about their fut
Search Results 0 to 49 of about 999 (some duplicates have been removed)